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Former baseball player Chien-ming Wang and his photos
Former Taiwanese baseball pitcher Wang Chien-ming is set to hold his first photo exhibit in late March.

A photo exhibit called “Wang’s Life” is set to open in the southern city of Tainan on March 27. The exhibit features photographs taken by Wang Chien-ming, the former pitcher for the New York Yankees who is currently a pitching coach in Taiwan.

Photography is Wang’s hobby. He took Cheap Baseball Jerseys pictures of nature, historical buildings, city streets, and of course, baseball fields.

But how did Wang develop an interest in photography? Speaking at a press conference on Wednesday, Wang said it started when photojournalists took pictures of him after he arrived in the United States. One day, Wang thought to himself: why not trade places? What would it be like if he were the one snapping photos?

Wang said that while playing baseball can be a nerve-wracking experience, taking pictures is more relaxing and can be done slowly.

Wang doesn’t have a preference when it comes to subjects, though he has found taking pictures of children interesting and even touching. The father of two sons said he takes more photos of his kids than other subjects, which allows him to have more interaction with them.

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Here are this week’s choices. Voting ends Thursday night. The winners will be announced on AL.com on Friday.

Trey Burrell, Hewitt-Trussville baseball: Burrell led the Huskies at the plate, batting .539 last week (7-for-13) with 5 five RBIs, a double and four runs.

Parker Carlson, Faith Academy baseball: Carlson helped the Rams go 3-1 in the East Alabama Classic. In a win over Sparkman, he had 2 doubles and 2 RBIs. He also was the winning pitcher in that game with a five-inning complete game. He struck out 8 and walking 1 and allowed 1 hit. He also had 3 hits and an RBI in a Jerseys Baseball win over Russell County.

Jeremy Hawkins, Shades Valley baseball: Hawkins hit .688 for the week with 11 hits, including a home run, 10 runs and 11 steals.

Eli Jennings, Vestavia Hills soccer: Jennings had 3 goals and an assist against Hewitt-Trussville and also scored a goal against Gadsden City.

Kaleb Jowers, Spain Park soccer: Jowers had 3 goals and an assist as the Jaguars beat Gadsden City and Homewood.

Charlie Keller, Mobile Christian baseball: Keller blasted 5 home runs in three games over the weekend as the Leopards defeated Gulfport, Jackson and Sweet Water. He hit 2 homers each against Gulfport and Jackson and 1 against Sweet Water.

Topher LaRussa, John Carroll: LaRussa had 4 goals and 2 assists this week.

David Locke, Westminster Christian: Locke struck out 12 batters in five innings, allowing just 2 hits in picking up a win. He batted .500 with a home run and a triple with 10 RBIs during the week.

Miguel Obando, Pelham soccer: Obando had goals in all three games this week, including a 45-yard goal against McAdory

Lane Smith, East Lawrence baseball: Smith hit .353 last week, scoring 6 times and driving in 4 runs, as his team went 4-2 overall.

Larkin Toth, McGill-Toolen baseball: Toth threw a 1-hitter in a win over UMS-Wright, allowing only a single with two outs in the seventh. He struck out 8.

Cam Warren, Saraland baseball: Warren helped the Spartans win three games in the East Alabama Baseball Classic. In a win over Russell County, he pitched a complete game and struck out 5. He also had 2 hits and an RBI. In a win over Opelika, Warren had 3 hits and 3 runs scored.

Vote for your choice in the survey below. Remember to hit the “finish survey” button when you have completed your vote.

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Last week’s “Did you really mean to say that?” column triggered quite a few comments. Apparently, many people can relate to the subtitle of my “Are We Communicating Yet?” book, which is “It’s not what you say, it’s what they hear that counts.”

With America’s diversity continuing to grow, the challenge to communicate “like you mean it” continues to grow. Just thinking about it Baseball Jerseys reminds of Club Managers Association of America.

CMAA consists of managers of country clubs, golf clubs, downtown athletic clubs, yacht clubs and such. I’ve spoken to them at state, regional, national and international meetings.

When leading a full-day seminar for them at an international convention a while back, one of the participants was manager of a club in South Africa. He’s an interesting person in an interesting situation. His 500 employees speak 22 different languages or dialects.

Since my program that day was “Motivation Through Effective Communication,” I asked him to share some of his challenging experiences with us.

Of course, with such diversity in his club, his challenges are many. Not only are there language hurdles to overcome, but there are customs, values and lifestyles with which to deal. And you thought you had it rough in trying to communicate with people!

One of these days, however, we all may be dealing with something similar to the South African club manager’s situation. For example, when I became a resident of the Smoky Mountains’ resort hamlet of Gatlinburg in 1972, English was the only language spoken here. (Of course, there were four dialects: Regular American, Southern American, Sevier Countian and Cocke Countian.) Today, however, the languages have increased.

When I led in a management seminar for a Gatlinburg business more recently, the owner said he had to communicate with some employees by acting out movements and pointing. The employees were hired through an international employee leasing agency. The owner told me, “It looks like the way things are going, we’ll have to learn some new languages.”

This reminds me of wife Jean accompanying me when I spoke in Miami Beach and we turned the trip into a mini-vacation. Since Jean has a tendency to use a lot of Kleenex, our supply was deleted the first day in the hotel. She wrote a note requesting more tissues, leaving the note in the bathroom. When we returned, the note was still there, but no tissues. As we were going out the next day, she left the note again.

Upon our return, still no tissues. So, she phoned housekeeping and explained the situation. The head housekeeper told her, “Oh, our maids can’t read English.” She sent us some tissues.

On the day we departed, we ordered breakfast to eat on the balcony overlooking the ocean. When a man arrived with the meal and I quickly determined he could not understand English, I attempted to communicate with my limited Spanish. It didn’t work. Later, I discovered he was from Greece. I’m sure he really wondered about me as I bombarded him with a few Spanish words mixed in with Southern American English.

Years ago, Bob Dylan’s song, “The Times They Are A-Changing” was ‘right on’ in many areas. One of these areas is definitely diversity. In order to communicate effectively today, we must expand not only our knowledge of languages but also our knowledge of the customs, values and lifestyles of people. But good communication begins with successfully communicating with family, friends, coworkers and others with whom we have regular contact.

Carl Mays is a National Speakers Hall of Fame member and author of over a dozen books, including A Strategy For Winning (foreword by Coach Lou Holtz). Email: [email protected]